Woodview Veterinary Clinic
Animal Wellness Center

Feline Vaccinations

Rabies

While Rabies is not required by law in cats like it is dogs in Wisconsin, it is recommended to be given to all cats, especially cats that go outdoors at all. Rabies is a fatal disease that affects the nervous system. It can be transmitted to humans. If your cat is not up to date on his/her rabies vaccine and bites a human, there is a mandatory 10 day quarantine period that has to occur at a veterinary clinic or animal control facility which can easily cost over 200 dollars. The first vaccine lasts for 1 year and then all rabies vaccines after that are good for 3 years.

Distemper Combo-FVRCP-C

The Feline Distemper Combo is actually 4 vaccines in one. It vaccinates for feline rhinotracheitis (herpes), calicivirus, chlamydia, and panleukopenia (parvo). These are the most common viruses associated with upper respiratory disease in cats (herpes, Chlamydia, and calici) as well as a severe gastrointestinal disease (panleukopenia). This is a yearly vaccine.

Rhinotracheitis (Herpes)

Feline Herpes is a disease that cats can spread to each other by direct contact or in the air similar to the cold in humans. Signs of the feline herpes virus are discharge from the eyes and nose, swelling of the tissue surrounding the eye (conjunctivitis), sneezing and occasionally coughing. This disease may progress to pneumonia. While there is not direct treatment for herpes virus there is some evidence that a supplement of L-lysine may reduce shedding and decrease the frequency of recurrence. This vaccine will not prevent the disease but it will make the symptoms less severe.

Calicivirus

Feline Calicivirus is spread in a similar way to feline herpes virus. Signs of feline calicivirus include oral ulcers, eye and nasal discharge, and conjunctivitis. There is not a direct treatment for calicivirus. Thus therapy is aimed at preventing a secondary bacteria infection and supportive care. This vaccine will not prevent the disease but it will make the symptoms less severe.

Panleukopenia (Feline Parvo)

Feline panleukopenia is a highly infectious virus that infects cats, raccoons, ferrets and mink. This disease usually starts off with a fever and decreased activity. It then progresses to vomiting and diarrhea which can lead to death. There is no direct treatment for feline panleukopenia, thus treatment is aimed at providing proper fluids and antibiotics to prevent bacterial infections. If a pregnant cat is infected with feline panleukopenia her kittens can develop cerebellar hypoplasia. Cerebellar hypoplasia causes stumbling and incoordination. These signs are for life; however kittens can learn to function with them and can lead relatively normal lives. This vaccine is highly effective at controlling the disease.

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is caused by a bacteria called Chlamydia psittaci and is spread via aerosol transmission just like herpes and calici virus. Signs include redness and discharge from the eyes, swelling of the tissue surrounding the eye (conjunctivitis), sneezing and nasal discharge, and occasionally coughing. This disease may progress to pneumonia if left untreated. It is most commonly seen in environments where several cats are in close contact and new cats are regularly introduced, like multi-cat households, catteries, and shelters. Chlamydia infections are treated with antibiotics. While the vaccine will not 100% prevent infection it will significantly decrease the severity of the disease.

Feline Leukemia

Feline Leukemia is a virus that is spread via direct contact to infected cats. Feline leukemia causes a decrease in the catís immune system therefore making him/her more susceptible to other diseases. Feline Leukemia has also been associated with a cancer called lymphoma. We recommend testing all stray cats that you are adopting for this disease before introducing them into your home. This vaccine is only recommended for cats that spend some of their time outside unsupervised and indoor cats that have contact with cats that go outside. It is a yearly vaccine.

Woodview Veterinary Clinic
3284 Lighthouse Ln.
West Bend, WI 53090
(262)338-1838
(262)338-4146 (fax)
woodviewvet@hotmail.com